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COOKING BEEF FROM FROZEN - COOKING BEEF


Cooking beef from frozen - Best high heat cooking oil.



Cooking Beef From Frozen





cooking beef from frozen






    cooking
  • (cook) someone who cooks food

  • The practice or skill of preparing food

  • the act of preparing something (as food) by the application of heat; "cooking can be a great art"; "people are needed who have experience in cookery"; "he left the preparation of meals to his wife"

  • The process of preparing food by heating it

  • (cook) prepare a hot meal; "My husband doesn't cook"

  • Food that has been prepared in a particular way





    frozen
  • (of a ball) Resting against another ball or a cushion

  • frigid: devoid of warmth and cordiality; expressive of unfriendliness or disdain; "a frigid greeting"; "got a frosty reception"; "a frozen look on their faces"; "a glacial handshake"; "icy stare"; "wintry smile"

  • turned into ice; affected by freezing or by long and severe cold; "the frozen North"; "frozen pipes"; "children skating on a frozen brook"

  • frozen(p): absolutely still; "frozen with horror"; "they stood rooted in astonishment"





    beef
  • meat from an adult domestic bovine

  • gripe: complain; "What was he hollering about?"

  • Flesh or muscle, typically when well developed

  • cattle that are reared for their meat

  • The flesh of a cow, bull, or ox, used as food

  • A cow, bull, or ox fattened for its meat











Homemade Beef Vegetable Soup




Homemade Beef Vegetable Soup





If you look closely... you can see the steam coming off the bowl.

We're having a dreary, misty day. They're calling for snow, sleet and ice all weekend. So, I'm back to my favorite food for nasty weather -- soup!

This is a soup my mom made a lot when I was a kid, and I make it the same way now. There's really not a recipe, just general guidelines. This batch of soup was especially nice because my friend gave me the beef bones and stew meat for the stock. She buys a split of beef from a local farmer from time to time. It was super quality meat and made delicious stock.

Here's the (sort of) Recipe:

1) Put several pounds of meaty soup bones (beef shanks) in a large stockpot with 6 cups of water and 2 cups of tomato juice. Add a large diced onion, several bay leaves and worcestershire sauce to the pot. Bring to a boil for about 10 minutes then reduce the heat and let it simmer for 90 minutes.

2) Strain the broth into another large pot. Set the soup bones aside to cool. In a large skillet, brown about a pound of stew meat. Once the outside of the meat is caramelized, add it to the stock.

3) Dice a pound or two of peeled potatoes into one inch cubes. Add them to the stock.

4) Bring the stock, potatoes and meat back to a boil. Reduce heat and continue to simmer for about 25-30 minutes.

5) Add whatever vegetables you like. I usually use a couple 1 pound bags of frozen mixed vegetables. (corn, carrots, peas and green beans - anything but gross, pasty lima beans). I also usually toss in some petite diced tomatoes. Bring it back to a boil for about 10 more minutes.

6) Meanwhile, chop the meat off the soup bones (they should be cool by now) and add it to the pot.

7) Season to taste with salt and pepper.

After I'm done with all my cooking, I give the pugs the discarded soup bones to gnaw on for a while. They love them and it's like a mini version of Animal Kingdom when they chew on them. They get quite nasty with one another defending their soup bones.











Machaca (smoked, dried, raw beef)




Machaca (smoked, dried, raw beef)





Machaca (also known as carne seca) is marinated, smoked, dried, (but raw) beef. You can think of it as Mexican beef jerky. It's tart, hot, and brittle, unlike latter-day syrup-and-glycerol-soaked jerkies.

Every time I make machaca I say I'll never do it again. We make it in ten-pound lots, so we don't have to do it very often.

Because machaca is raw, it has to be made in clean-room conditions with sterilized tools and work surfaces. You have to wear surgical gloves when handling the beef. It has to be less than 1/4 inch thick, so that the marinade and smoke penetrate to the center. I get my butcher to slice a top round to thickness, and then I cut strips from the slices.

The marinade has to have the correct pH, salinity and seasonings if the final product is going to be safe to eat. It has to be boiled, then cooled down to the freezing point.

You marinate the beef in sealed containers at a temperature no higher than 0C (32F) for several hours, shaking periodically to make sure the brine gets to every surface.

You dry the beef strips (first) in a smoker and (second) in an air dryer at 70 C (160 F) for several hours without letting the temperature vary by more than +/- 5 degrees C. Most home-use air dryers won't reach this temperature.

Machaca is a pain to make, but it sure does taste good. You can eat it like jerky or use it in Mexican cooking.

The USDA says you shouldn't make machaca at home. Too dangerous.

I make it on days when I'm feeling lucky. :)










cooking beef from frozen







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